Michigan needs the NITC

U.S. Rep. Gary Peters

Last week, I was honored to host Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson at a roundtable in Detroit to discuss a new future for Michigan. Local leaders from business, labor and agriculture groups joined local, state, federal and Canadian officials in sharing an economic vision for Michigan. The vision is for a New International Trade Crossing (NITC) at the Detroit-Windsor Border and a revitalized customs plaza in Port Huron, as well as connecting Toronto and Chicago with new cargo and high-speed rail through Detroit. This investment and plan for Michigan’s future will make our state an international trade and logistics hub leading to thousands of new jobs.

The proposed NITC calls for a six-lane bridge spanning the Detroit River between Detroit and Windsor, enhancing a vital trade corridor by linking I-75 and I-94 in Michigan to Highway 401 in Ontario. This project will play a critical role in creating jobs throughout the Midwest and increasing U.S. exports. However, funding for a new customs plaza to service the bridge has not been secured.

Detroit is strategically located between Chicago and Toronto on an international border. Cities positioned along major trade routes have thrived and benefited by serving as a center for logistics, innovation and exports throughout history. A customs plaza at the New International Trade Crossing is the right thing to do for our economy, our state and our middle class, and that’s exactly what Secretary Johnson heard from a cross section and bipartisan delegation of our state’s economic leaders.

Secretary Johnson’s visit was important because the Department of Homeland Security is the federal agency responsible for customs plazas, and visiting Michigan and meeting our leaders helped illustrate for him how important these facilities are not just for security but for growing our economy through faster and more efficient trade and commerce. At the meeting, the Secretary noted that one of his responsibilities is “to promote lawful trade and travel.”

That is important, because Michigan’s economic future depends on one of our most important trading partners: Canada. Canada and the U.S. are the world’s largest trading partners with $710 billion in goods and services, in 2012. In Michigan, trade with Canada is directly linked to middle class jobs and the success of our state’s most important industries like auto manufacturing, agriculture, tourism and biofuels. Michigan exports $25.9 billion to Canada annually and 218,000 Michigan jobs depend on trade with Canada. Michigan sells more goods to Canada than to the state’s next 12 largest foreign markets combined.

All of this should point us to one clear focus: doing everything we can to facilitate and increase trade at the northern border. This project, as part of our overall economic plan, will boost trade, create good-paying, middle class jobs, strengthen our border security and put Michigan on a path to being an international transportation and logistics hub. We already have the strategic location and talented workforce. Now, we just need to work together to construct these important infrastructure projects.

It’s important that we act quickly, because communities near these projects are already facing the negative impacts of delayed action instead of reaping the positive economic benefits. It’s why I have taken the lead by proposing Congressional action to prioritize funding for trade crossings with the highest trade volume by value of shipments, including exports and imports. The Detroit–Windsor crossing and Port Huron crossing rank number two and four, respectively, in trade volume for land ports of entry in the United States.

I am committed to these projects because I know how important they are to our state and economy. We can make our northern border a national priority by working in a bipartisan way. Gov. Rick Snyder, members of the Michigan delegation and business and labor leaders across our state have all come out in favor of this project and my legislation.

I am very proud of the impressive presentation our economic leaders gave to Secretary Johnson last week, but I continue to be frustrated with President Obama’s lack of further commitment on this important project for Michigan. We discussed this very issue last month during his visit to our state. I will continue to showcase the incredible work force and trade capacity of our state and look forward to Michigan securing the necessary funding to build this bridge, but also to securing a stronger economic foundation for Michigan’s future.

Gary Peters, D-Bloomfield Twp., represents Michigan’s 14th District. He is co-chair of the Congressional Caucus on Canada and is running for U.S. Senate.

Originally posted in the Detroit News