Eddie Francis named to international bridge authority

Windsor Mayor Eddie Francis has been named to the international authority that will oversee the construction of the new publicly owned $1-billion bridge connecting Windsor, Ont., and Detroit.

Francis, who did not seek re-election in last month’s municipal election, is the last of six members to be named to the authority. The appointment takes effect Dec. 1.

Craig S. Rix was also named to the board of directors of the Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) for a term of three years.

The international authority oversees construction while the WDBA will oversee operations once complete.

“Mr. Francis is keenly aware of the issues and challenges that face the community. I also warmly welcome Mr. Rix to the board of directors of the Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority. Their experience will greatly benefit the WDBA and International Authority as they build the new bridge,” Mark McQueen, chairperson of the board of directors said in a release.

Francis is the only local representative on the authority that is designed to ensure the Canada-Michigan agreement to build the new crossing is followed.

“I commend the Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority for its excellent choice in appointing Mr. Eddie Francis to the International Authority,” Watson said in a news release. “As long-time City of Windsor Mayor, Mr. Francis has been a key player on this file since the beginning. His experience and knowledge, combined with the public policy and governance expertise of Mr.Rix, ensure that the two authorities are well prepared to continue working toward the building of this vital, job-creating infrastructure project that is the future new bridge between Windsor, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan.”

Canadian Transport Minister Lisa Raitt and Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder named five members back in July.

Kristine Burr and Genevieve Gagnon were appointed by Raitt. At that time, one Canadian was still to be named.

Americans Michael D. Hayes, Birgit M. Klohs and Matt Rizik were appointed by the U.S.

The group of six will oversee and approve key steps in the procurement process for the new crossing. It will also monitor compliance of the Windsor-Detroit Authority with the crossing agreement, signed by Canada and Michigan in 2012.

The bridge is expected to open in 2020.

The total cost of the project would be about $4 billion Cdn, including work on freeway interchanges, customs plazas in both countries and infrastructure work.

The new bridge will have six lanes and border inspection on both sides of the Detroit River, Raitt previously said.

The U.S. has yet to announce funding for its customs plaza in Detroit. Watson was mum on the progress of that facility.

Officials said Monday that the biggest hurdles now are time and procuring resources.

The Ambassador Bridge, privately owned by Matty Moroun, is 85 years old and has four lanes.

Originally posted by CBC News

Traffic chaos following construction near Ambassador Bridge

Traffic was at a standstill coming off the Ambassador Bridge into Windsor on Saturday.

“There’s nothing I can do about it. We’re held captive by the city,” says one distraught truck driver.

Transport trucks along with regular traffic was detoured to Wyandotte Street west down Crawford to Tecumseh Road West and then back to Huron Church Road.

On an average day, the detour adds about 10 minutes onto the commute.

On Saturday that that doubled.

“We worked really closely with the city of Windsor, Windsor PD and the contractor to ensure the detour worked very efficiently,” says Randy Spader of the Canadian Transit Company.

Southbound lanes off the Ambassador Bridge were closed to replace the railroad tracks intersecting with Huron Church.

“Over the years the tracks have deteriorated, rusted and the head of the rail separated from the web, so it cracks. So when the train goes by it could leave the tracks,” says Richard Gouin, signal maintainer.

During the closure, the Canadian Border Services Agency was reporting a 30 minute delay.

Originally posted by: CTV Windsor

Detroit council wants property sale proceeds for DRIC bridge pumped back into Delray

Detroit council on Monday demanded something in writing that guarantees re-investment in Delray’s neighbourhoods when the city sells 300 properties to the state for the new Detroit River bridge leading to Windsor.

“They keep telling us we can negotiate these things down the road, but our community is seven years down the road on this — how much longer do we need to wait to get this?” said Detroit Coun. Raquel Castaneda-Lopez, who represents the Delray community.

Given the massive makeover that lies ahead for the downriver industrial community during construction of the $2.1-billion Detroit River International Crossing project, neighbourhood leaders have been fighting hard to get “community benefits” in writing before bridge construction gets started.

Detroit council last week unanimously rejected a request by the city’s Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr to approve the property sale for $1.4 million until community protection and investment for Delray gets put in writing.

Under protocol, Detroit’s council had to come up with its own counter proposal instead of Orr’s request — which Castaneda-Lopez put together and was approved by council on Monday.

Both Orr’s request and council’s proposal will be sent to Lansing for a decision by the state government’s Emergency Loan Board within the next couple weeks.

“The proposal has just been received and is under review,” said David Murray, spokesman for Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder on Monday.

Government staff and those connected to the bridge project will review what can be addressed in terms of the community’s requests, he said.

What the community wants is “legally binding agreements” for most of the $1.4 million to be reinvested in Delray for such things as housing improvements, demolishing vacant buildings, diesel pollution mitigation and fixing street lighting, according to Castaneda-Lopez’s proposal.

They also want community leaders consulted in development of the request for proposal for the bridge project, plus reinstatement of a $1.9-million government housing grant designated for Delray, but has long remained on hold.

“Planting 50 trees is the (current) community benefit to take care of the diesel emissions,” Castaneda-Lopez said. “At this point, that’s very much our reality.

“You would think they would want a thriving, beautiful community for those coming off the bridge to drive through or stop. You want that on both sides of the border, otherwise this (bridge) really doesn’t move us forward as a region or a city.”

Local MP Brian Masse (NDP -Windsor West) represents the riding where the DRIC bridge will be located on the Canadian side in Brighton Beach.

“You can’t hold it against them for trying to improve their community for the new border crossing,” Masse said. “I have been over there several times and it’s a reasonable request they are making.

“They just want to do this right. More power to them because they are the ones who are going to have to live there and co-exist with the border crossing.”

If the property deal is eventually approved, it would be the first properties acquired on the U.S. side for the DRIC project. Causing a delay of a few added weeks in getting the property sale completed is worth it if a resolution can satisfy the Delray community, Masse said.

“Hopefully, they can come to agreement or a compromise that works for everybody — and then let’s get moving forward on this,” he said. “You only get one shot at this — it might another 100 years before they build another one — so this should be a signature crossing.”

Originally posted by the: Windsor Star

More tenders issued to advance construction of DRIC bridge

Several tenders to advance construction of the planned $2.1-billion Detroit River International Crossing (DRIC) project are being issued over the next several weeks with the first being issued on Tuesday.

The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) is rolling out requests for proposals and seeking quotations on information technology, finding office accommodations, website development and others.

“These requests for proposals mark an important step towards the WDBA becoming fully operational,” said Michael Cautillo, the WDBA’s president and CEO.

“We look forward to having local and area businesses compete and for them to be part of this exciting project.”

Information on the RFPs and other opportunities will be published in local newspapers, on the MERX electronic tendering system and eventually on the new WDBA website.

Decisions on the RFPs are expected to be made within weeks, according to a spokesman for the WDBA.

More office and project related opportunities will be issued over the coming months, Cautillo said.

The WDBA will oversee planning, construction and operation of the DRIC bridge which will connect the industrial communities of Brighton Beach and Delray. It is expected to open in 2020.

Originally posted in: The Windsor Star

Purchase of first U.S. properties for new border bridge close

The Windsor Star
Dave Battagello

Detroit’s city council is being asked to approve the sale of 301 properties needed for a new border crossing bridge to Windsor.

They will be the first properties acquired on the U.S. side if Detroit council approves the request by emergency manager Kevyn Orr, as expected within the next 10 days.

The properties are largely vacant, “tax-reverted” parcels with a total price tag of $1.4 million.

The state of Michigan would be the new owner of the properties, which the Canadian government would buy from it for the $2.1-billion Detroit River International Crossing project. Ottawa has budgeted $631 million over the next two years for the project, including the land purchases.

Canada has committed to paying Michigan’s share of the project cost, up to $550 million, to buy land and build a feeder road linking the bridge plaza in Detroit to the I-75 freeway.

The government expects to recoup its investment through tolls.

The Windsor-Detroit Detroit Bridge Authority was established last month to get the project moving. It has already staged a handful of meetings and has plans to establish an office in Windsor and begin hiring about three dozen staff in the coming weeks.

“The WDBA continues to work with our Michigan colleagues to advance this important project,” said authority CEO Michael Cautillo said Thursday. “All involved are encouraged that the issue will be considered by Detroit’s council.”

The DRIC bridge, scheduled to open in 2020, will link the downriver industrial communities of Brighton Beach in Windsor and Delray in Detroit.

Nearly all property required on the Canadian side for the project has been acquired by Transport Canada.

In total, there are roughly 1,000 residential and commercial properties that need to be expropriated and purchased for the bridge, plaza and feeder roads in Delray.

It is anticipated the overall cost for those properties will be about $300 million — roughly the same amount spent in Windsor to buy land for the $1.4-billion Herb Gray Parkway.

The parkway – the new border feeder highway that will link with the DRIC bridge – is expected to be completed late next year.

Originally posted by The Windsor Star

Editorial: Another step forward on a new bridge

There is progress on the New International Trade Crossing. That bodes well for all of Michigan, the U.S. and Canada, as a more efficient crossing will benefit business on both sides of the border.

Gov. Rick Snyder and Canadian Transport Minister Lisa Raitt announced a new authority to oversee construction of the bridge between Windsor and Detroit.

The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority will be international. Snyder named three members at a news conference this week.

The Moroun family, owners of the Ambassador Bridge, have fought relentlessly to block the bridge project, but their efforts — including an attempt to pass a 2012 ballot proposal that would have hampered the bridge project — have failed.

While there remains a question of federal funding to construct a customs plaza in Detroit, Snyder and Raitt said that would not stand in the way of efforts to begin construction of the bridge, called by Snyder the New International Trade Crossing.

One hurdle still ahead: U.S. government officials have not yet committed funds for a customs plaza needed as part of the project. Michigan’s congressional delegation should keep that need top-of-mind — and Michigan voters should question candidates about it this fall.

The Detroit-Windsor crossing is one of the nation’s busiest. Automakers and other manufacturers, as well as major business groups, former governors from both political parties and numerous others support the new bridge. Canadian officials want a better route than the existing bridge provides for traffic on their side of the crossing. Business wants better efficiency. And many note that private ownership of a major international bridge is a risk to national security.

Snyder has kept this project moving. Now the Congressional delegation must do its part.

An LSJ editorial

‘Major announcement’ to be made about new Windsor-Detroit bridge

A “major announcement” will be made Wednesday in Windsor regarding the New International Trade Crossing.

A source tells CTV Windsor that Canada’s Transport Minister, Lisa Raitt and Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder will announce the bodies that will oversee the NITC project. A bridge authority and an international authority will be responsible for things like land acquisitions and procurement going forward.

The announcement will be made at the Canadian Club Heritage Centre in Windsor at 10:30 a.m.

On Monday, Detroit’s state-appointed emergency manager Kevyn Orr delayed the proposed transfer of 301 properties to the Michigan Land Bank in exchange for $1.4 million from the Canadian Government.The city of Detroit is currently under bankruptcy protection.

The $2 billion NITC is expected to open in 2020.

Originally posted by CTV Windsor

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