Ferry owner favors Detroit River bridge – even if it costs his job

There have been many voices speaking up in favor of a second bridge between Detroit and Windsor.

Top Canadian officials, Gov. Rick Snyder, big business all hunger for this planned new bridge to be built about two miles south of the Ambassador Bridge.

But one of those speaking up for a new bridge is someone who stands to lose his livelihood once the bridge is up and carrying traffic.

Gregg Ward operates the Detroit-Windsor Truck Ferry. It carries the trucks hauling hazardous materials across the Detroit River, since the Ambassador Bridge is not certified for trucks carrying cargos like gasoline or paint.

Ward says it’s the larger picture that matters, even if that means putting him out of job.

“One of the benefits of this project is, there will be thousands and thousands of jobs, and thousands and thousands of families that will benefit. We have to look at this as a very large regional project that will expand our opportunity … not just look at ourselves,” says Ward.

http://cpa.ds.npr.org/michigan/audio/2014/09/ss_9_10_14_Ward_Bridge-ferry-owner_.mp3

* Listen to our conversation with Gregg Ward above.

Originally posted by: Michigan Radio

More empty Promises from Moroun?

Michigan Central Station, a well-known symbol of Detroit’s decay, is
expected to get $80 million in renovations over the next three years,
according to a top aide to depot owner Manuel (Matty) Moroun.

The revelation was made by Moroun associate Dan Stamper as he went
before the Detroit City Council last week to discuss alternative plans
to the city selling land needed for a new bridge to Canada.

The bridge — known as the New International Trade Crossing — could put
thousands of people to work in southeast Michigan and revitalize the
trade corridor with Canada. It would connect highways in Detroit and
Windsor, relieving traffic congestion for commercial trucks and other
vehicles.

Moroun, who controls the Ambassador Bridge, unsuccessfully sued a
number of federal officials and the Canadian government in a bid to
block the building of the rival bridge.

In 2012, he spent more than $33 million to support Proposal 6, which
would have required a statewide vote before a public crossing could be
built across the Detroit River. Voters rejected the proposal.

The state offered $1.4 million for 301 city-owned parcels needed for
the bridge project to proceed. The council rejected the deal, in part,
over concerns the sale price was too low. Emergency manager Kevyn Orr
is expected to approve the sale anyway. But the council can propose an
alternative plan this week to a state emergency loan board.

As an alternative to the state’s offer, Stamper offered $1.5 million
for the land in the Delray community in southwest Detroit, plus $1
million to help fix up the community.

At Tuesday’s council meeting, Councilwoman Saunteel Jenkins said she
was happy to see Moroun’s associate promise to help that community.

“There is one building that you all have not demolished,” Jenkins said
of the depot. “Whenever they show the demise of Detroit there are two
buildings they always show — one is the Packard Plant, the other is
the train station.”

“We are going to renovate the train depot,” Stamper replied. “It’s
probably another three years to secure the building watertight.”

He said the offer is not an attempt to block the bridge project. He
said a second Ambassador Bridge would be built without disturbing the
Delray community.

The council, however, showed no interest in pursuing Moroun’s offer
for the Delray land.

After Tuesday’s meeting, Jenkins didn’t seem impressed with Stamper’s
description of plans to renovate the train station.

“That’s a pledge that I’ve heard multiple times,” Jenkins said.

Originally posted in the: Detroit Free Press

Moroun low-balls Detroit, but city too smart to fall for it

The last time billionaire Manuel (Matty) Moroun tried to derail a new bridge to Canada, he spent $33 million.

This time, he’s angling for a deal. Moroun’s latest attempt to throw a wrench in the works of the New International Trade Crossing — the proposed-but-not-yet-built public span to Canada — is an offer to buy 301 city-owned parcels of land in southwest Detroit for the low, low price of $2.5 million. The land in question is essential to the state’s bridge-building effort, and Moroun’s offer is about $1.1 million more than the State of Michigan offered to pay.

Selling the land to Moroun would be a terrible plan under any circumstances — the kind of short-term thinking that’s focused on inconsequential short-term benefit at the expense of long-term health and stability.

Moroun owns more property than almost any private landowner in the city. He’s also one of the city’s most flagrant blight violators. (If you’d like to see a sample of his work, check out the decaying Michigan Central Station.)

Detroit’s nonprofit and municipal communities have worked diligently to develop a better land-use strategy for Detroit, empowering the city’s land bank to sell dilapidated properties at auction to homeowners who want to live in the city, with the side effect of making property unavailable to the bulk buyers who rake in hundreds of properties every year at the annual tax-foreclosure auction and do nothing with them.

We’ve seen the development of the Detroit Future City plan, a new framework for land use in the city. And Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan has consolidated and streamlined the city’s blight-enforcement operation, stepping up the pace of code enforcement and demolition.

But at this price? Frankly, it’s insulting.

Moroun, 83, is the owner of the Ambassador Bridge, one of Detroit’s two border crossings to Canada. The aging Ambassador Bridge is in bad shape, and subject to frequent traffic clogs; Moroun wants to build a second span in the same location. The state wants to build a second, publicly owned span in a different location, in conjunction with Canada. Canada will foot much of the project’s cost.

Moroun, obviously, would like to continue his bridge monopoly, and is willing to pay to do it … but not that much. This time, anyway. I mean, let’s keep in mind that Moroun is No. 352 on the Forbes 400, a list of the country’s wealthiest individuals, and has a net worth of $1.5 billion. And don’t forget that, two years ago, he spent $33 million in an attempt to pass a statewide proposal barring construction of any new, public border crossing without a popular vote.

So, for Moroun to offer $2.5 million this time, well, it’s kind of chump change.

For what it’s worth, the Detroit City Council has given short shrift to Moroun’s offer, and indicated during a Thursday session that his pitch isn’t on the table. The council also rejected the sale of the land to the state, saying the neighborhood development agreement negotiated by Mayor Mike Duggan’s team doesn’t do enough to protect residents. Detroit emergency manager Kevyn Orr will likely push the sale through without council’s approval, with a community benefits agreement to be developed during the bidding for bridge construction and concessions.

Selling 301 properties to Moroun at any price would be disastrous, a return to the kind of thinking that has helped make Detroit a hodgepodge of stable neighborhoods and blighted, emptying blocks. Rationalizing land use — that’s where Detroit’s healthy future lies. Not in moving property for a pittance.

Originally posted in the: Detroit Free Press

Awaiting word from feds, NITC officials continue prep work for Detroit River bridge

While officials await word from Washington that it will pay for its toll plaza for the New International Trade Crossing, the prep work continues for the new bridge across the Detroit River on both sides of the border.

“They are still pretty much keeping on schedule, but they are having to work around the fact they don’t have the federal funds yet,” said Tom Shields, New International Trade Crossing coalition spokesman and president of Lansing-based Marketing Resource Group. “In order for this thing to really launch, they need the commitment of the dollars for the toll plaza.”

That amounts to about $264 million, but there have been no guarantees the federal government will come through with the funding. The Canadian government is paying for everything else related to the $2 billion project.

As the lobbying for that funding continues by state officials and members of the congressional delegation, the Michigan and Canadian governments are doing everything else they can to keep the project moving for targeted completion by 2020.

The state is close to finalizing its first land acquisition, which will represent about 30 percent of the parcels needed to locate the bridge landing and toll plaza.

Earlier this week, the Detroit City Council rejected the state’s offer of $1.4 million for 301 parcels in the Delray neighborhood where the new bridge will land, but Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr plans to approve it anyway, which he has the authority to do under state law.

But the council can prepare an alternative plan for the state’s emergency loan board to consider next week, similar to what it did when the state was considering the leasing of Belle Isle. The board rejected the council’s Belle Isle plan and went with Orr’s plan to lease the park to the state.

Part of the council’s counterproposal is expected to include its idea for a community benefits package for the residents of Delray, something Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Detroit, who represents the area, has always sought.

She said the package should include funding to help rehabilitate some of the most dilapidated of the 2,000 homes that will remain in the area surrounding the new bridge. Once the bridge is in place and the increased truck traffic commences, Tlaib said, those homes are never going to be able to increase their property values without assistance.

While the bridge project references having a community benefit component, she said it is not defined.

She said she does not want the vendor to just plant some trees and then be able to check off a box that it provided “community benefits.”

“We really want something sustainable,” she said. “We don’t people to cross that border and see poverty and decay and blight. We want people to come across and see Pure Michigan, Pure Detroit, see a really thriving border community.”

Another wrinkle in the land acquisition appears to have had little effect.

At this week’s council meeting, Ambassador Bridge Co. President Dan Stamper presented a plan to outbid the state and purchase the parcels for $1.5 million, with another $1 million to begin rebuilding homes in the neighborhood.

That offer was met with skepticism from council members and was not accepted.

Ambassador Bridge owner Matty Moroun has always opposed the new bridge, and has spent millions doing so. His company has also purchased some of the parcels that the state will need to acquire before moving forward with construction.

Those properties will take longer to acquire, Shields said, as the state is expected to have to use eminent domain to obtain them.

Because the Legislature did not allow the state to spend money to purchase property, the state is doing the negotiating for the land purchases, then after the six-member International Authority approves the purchase, the Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority will pay for the land.

The International Authority, which consists of three members each from Michigan and Canada, was created in 2012 as part of a border-crossing agreement the two governments signed that year. The bridge authority, also created in 2012, is a not-for-profit crown corporation which reports to the Canadian Parliament through the Minister of Transport.

The Canadian government has acquired about 80 percent of the properties it needs, and land acquisition is expected to be completed in the next year and a half, with the possibility of a four-year construction period beginning sometime in 2016.

 

Originally posted in: Crain’s Detroit Business

Detroit EM To Go Ahead With Land Sale For New US-Canada Bridge Despite Objections

DETROIT (WWJ/AP) – The Detroit City Council might not like a proposal to sell 301 city-owned properties to build a new bridge between the U.S. and Canada — but that’s not going to stop state-appointed Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr.

The council on Tuesday unanimously rejected the $1.4 million deal to make way for a new commuter bridge to Windsor, Ontario, saying the proposal did nothing to protect the Delray neighborhood or its nearly 900 residents who would be forced to move.

Orr is expected to push the deal through, anyway.

Under Michigan state law, Orr has the power to veto council’s vote and go ahead with the sale. Otherwise, the council would have until Sept. 16 to submit an alternative plan. A state emergency loan board would then decide between Orr’s original plan and the council’s counter-offer.

The U.S. State Department approved the bridge project last year, but construction hasn’t started yet. Canada is paying most of the $2 billion project’s cost on both sides of the border and plans to recoup the money through tolls.

The new span would cross the Detroit River about two miles south of the Ambassador Bridge, from the Brighton Beach neighborhood in Windsor to the Delray neighborhood in Detroit. Officials say they hope to open the bridge in 2020.

The project is opposed by the owner of the existing Ambassador Bridge, Manuel “Matty” Moroun, whose family wants to build its own second span. Records show the Moroun family has spent over $1 million since 2009 in their fight to stop a new government-owned span.

An estimated 2.7 million trucks pass through the Detroit-Windsor crossing, carrying $120-billion worth of goods annually.

Originally posted by: CBS Detroit

More tenders issued to advance construction of DRIC bridge

Several tenders to advance construction of the planned $2.1-billion Detroit River International Crossing (DRIC) project are being issued over the next several weeks with the first being issued on Tuesday.

The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) is rolling out requests for proposals and seeking quotations on information technology, finding office accommodations, website development and others.

“These requests for proposals mark an important step towards the WDBA becoming fully operational,” said Michael Cautillo, the WDBA’s president and CEO.

“We look forward to having local and area businesses compete and for them to be part of this exciting project.”

Information on the RFPs and other opportunities will be published in local newspapers, on the MERX electronic tendering system and eventually on the new WDBA website.

Decisions on the RFPs are expected to be made within weeks, according to a spokesman for the WDBA.

More office and project related opportunities will be issued over the coming months, Cautillo said.

The WDBA will oversee planning, construction and operation of the DRIC bridge which will connect the industrial communities of Brighton Beach and Delray. It is expected to open in 2020.

Originally posted in: The Windsor Star

New bridge authority seeking bids for services

The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority, the entity that will build a new government bridge between Canada and the Motor City, is seeking bids for suppliers to help it get organized.

The Windsor Star was reporting this week that initial requests issued Tuesday, known as tenders, were asking for proposals and quotations on computer services , office space, website development, and more.

The Star quoted Michael Cautillo, the authority’s new president and CEO , as saying the proposals being sought would be a key step in helping the newly formed authority to get organized.

“We look forward to having local and area businesses compete and for them to be part of this exciting project,” Cautillo told the Star.

As reported by the Free Press recently, Cautillo has said the authority eventually will hire 40 to 50 staffers to help him run the project.

The future span, known in Michigan as the New International Trade Crossing, is planned to connect Detroit and Windsor about two miles downstream from the Ambassador Bridge. The bridge is expected to be ready for traffic around 2020 and to create thousands of construction jobs.

Originally posted by the: Detroit Free Press